GMC100

Last week I talked about a far off land that is almost like another country. Just like here in the south, when you have plenty of land in a rural area your old dead cars & trucks end up out back somewhere. If you look out behind the farmhouse “complex” on these farms you will usually find all manner of abandoned vehicle, usually two or three from every decade. This is one of those.

GMC100

This is on the farm that my Dad grew up on. It is now owned & operated (successfully) by some cousins of mine. On the farms of North Dakota you have vast flat treeless lands. Occasionally you will see the farm house, barns, and grain silos all huddled together with some evergreen trees circling around, planted there to try to protect against 40 mph winds when it’s 40 degrees BELOW zero.

GMC100

I found this old truck being used as a junk storage bin in 1999(?). A brief internet search indicates it’s either a 55 or 56. If it was a Chevy I could probably pin it down but there is not a whole lot of detail available for GMCs that old. I’m guessing this would would be a little difficult to restore compared to the Chevy, because restoring an old Chevy now only requires a catalog and a credit card.

GMC100

The tags are from 1974, it probably hasn’t moved under it’s own power since then. It amazes me how well preserved the old junkers are there, despite the harsh climate. The main issue I saw was when windows were left down water would rust out the floor boards. I’m willing to bet this truck is still sitting in the same spot, still in the same condition. I hope so. On my “To Do When I Hit The Lottery” list is take a flat bed truck to “NoDak” and haul back some beauties like this to restore.

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